Introspection Illusion Plato and Augustine

Introspection Illusion Plato and Augustine 1. General Theme
Introspections
2. Justification
I chose this theme because it is relevant in my daily interactions with other people, but more so, it is relevant when describing Plato.

Introspection Illusion Plato and Augustine
Introspection Illusion Plato and Augustine

Throughout this course I have found myself wondering why Plato presents ideas the way that he does, why does he think that his ideal conditions are THE ideal conditions for everyone. He seems to brush off any criticism in a way that says “I am right, you’re wrong but you don’t have the knowledge to know any better” I believe this is the reason he is unable to differentiate his ideas of timocracy and tyranny. I intend to argue that these are one in the same.
3. Philosopher(s) to be discussed
Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes
I would like to discuss Socrates because he was Plato’s teacher. It is important to understand the lessons Socrates taught Plato in order to evaluate Plato’s philosophy. I am also choosing to include Aristotle because he was Plato’s pupil who offered a critical and intimate perspective on Plato’s teachings. Augustine’s relation of prayer to introspection. Descartes introspection of “I think therefore I exist.”

Research Question on Introspection Illusion Plato and Augustine

Was Plato’s introspection illusion so extreme that his ideas were clouded by his personal experiences and unable to see past his own reality?
5. Outline Example
I. Introduction
II. The Main question: Was Plato’s introspection illusion so extreme that his ideas were clouded by his personal experiences and unable to see past his own reality?
III. Comparison of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and my views on how they are hypocrites.
IV. Contemporary views on how timocracy and tyranny are the same things as an example of contradiction.
V. Conclusion

Introspection Illusion Plato and Augustine Required Sources

Augustine, Confessions (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992)
Descartes, R. Philosophical Essays and Correspondence (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2000)
Plato, Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo (Indianapolis: Hackett, 1981)
Additional Source Possibilities
Apel, K.-O. “The transcendental conception of language/communication and the idea of a First Philosophy: Towards a critical reconstruction of the History of Philosophy in the light of Language Philosophy” in Selected Essays. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press, 1994, pp. 85-90.
Bordo, S. (Ed.) Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes. University Park, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999.
Brown, P. Augustine of Hippo. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1969.
Cottingham, J. Descartes. London, Routledge, 1999
Frede, M. “Plato’s Arguments and the Dialogue Form” in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy (Supplementary Vol. 1992: “Methods of Interpreting Plato and his Dialogues”). Oxford: Clarendon, 1992, pp. 201-219.
Nozick, R. The Examined Life. Philosophical Meditations, New York, Touchstone Books, 1989.
Wills, G. Saint Augustine. New York: Penguin, 1999.

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