Electronic Health Record Communication Technologies

Electronic Health Record Communication Technologies
Electronic Health Record Communication Technologies

Electronic Health Record Communication Technologies

Order Instructions:

Instructions

Read the Real World Case (at the end of Chapter 16) in course text book Health Information Management Technology: An Applied Approach (Fourth Edition) and answer the following questions using the knowledge you gained from the chapter. Your responses should be written in paragraph format:
1. What are the physicians trying to accomplish through buying the same EHR product at their hospital? What are the pros and cons? 2. Why cannot the physicians send a medication order to the hospital from their e- prescribing device? 3. What is the difference between scanning, COLD feeding, and point-of-care (POC) data entry? 4. How could the hospital improve upon its data quality? 5. Use the information that you gathered so far for your previous PowerPoint assignments and consider the real world case study and what the physicians are trying to accomplish by purchasing these products. When you think about the system development life cycle, use what you learned to determine how this could help in accomplishing the goals associated with this case study.

Requirements

The Assignment should be four to five pages in length, prepared in a Microsoft Word
document, and APA-formatted.
This Assignment should follow the conventions of Standard American English (correct
grammar, punctuation, etc.). Your writing should be well ordered, logical, and unified, as well
as original and insightful. The resources used (including your text) should be properly cited.
Your work should display superior content, organization, style, and mechanics.
This Assignment must have a title page and a reference page.

SAMPLE ANSWER

Electronic Health Record Communication Technologies

Physicians have adopted a new move of trying to improve and support users through making available complete and accurate data, practitioner reminders and alerts, links to bodies of medical knowledge, clinical decision support systems, and other aids when buying the same EHR product at hospital (Merida, 2012). Therefore, the physicians were propelled to improve quality and continuity of health care at the hospital. The advantage of buying the same EHR is that back-up of information is integrated into the hospital system (Merida, 2012). Another advantage is that no interfaces are required or a few of them are to be employed to perfect the process. The disadvantage of purchasing the same EHR at the hospital is that the hospital had a greater need meeting regulatory and financial requirements. Billing and accounting packages are costly to acquire and install (Merida, 2012). The reason why the physicians cannot send a medication order to the hospital from their e-prescribing device is that they feared of patient not accepting electronic prescription and ought for mediation to be written on paper form.

The difference between scanning, COLD feeding, and Point-of Care (POC) data entry is that POC is used to input information to mobile phones, PDA, and tablets. Scanning is the method used to get information from papers through use of lens. COLD feeding is the process of storing large mass of data on a laser disk (Merida, 2012). Meanwhile, the hospital could have improved on its quality data by successful implementation of HER, which calls for strong leadership, mandatory staff training, strict adherence to time and budget and overall involvement of clinical staff in the design of EHR (Merida, 2012). When the physicians address the cons from EHR and improve on its quality data, it will effect faster retrieval of hospital data, and this will consequently enhance realization of its goal to improve health care.Reference

Merida, J. (2012).Health Information Management Technology. An Applied Approach (Fourth Edition). Chicago; AHIMA.

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A memorandum on culture’s impact on communication

A memorandum on culture's impact on communication
A memorandum on culture’s impact on                                  communication

A memorandum on culture’s impact on communication

Order Instructions:

I need it to be written in a memo format. I’ve attached detailed instructions

SAMPLE ANSWER

A memorandum on culture’s impact on communication

July 7th, 2014

To:                   Instructor’s Name, Title

From:                Student Name

Subject:            Culture’s Impact on Communication

Introduction

Understanding the challenges as well as opportunities of intercultural communication is of major importance. A person will be able to develop effective intercultural communication which will allow him/her to foster more respect and acceptance, dismiss myths, develop more cooperative relationships with other people, and break down stereotypes (LeBaron, 2013). Communicating with persons from dissimilar cultures could at times be rather challenging given that unintentional offenses and misinterpretations are common.Understanding the challenges and opportunities of intercultural communication will help to improve cross-cultural communication within the organization. It will allow people to appreciate and know the differences in cultural communication styles (LeBaron, 2013).

Discussion

The ideas of low context and high context refer to the way that persons communicate in dissimilar cultures. Low context basically means much information is exchanged clearly and unequivocally through the message itself and rarely is anything hidden or unclear. Persons who live in low-context cultures for instance Western cultures – Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and North America– have the tendency of following standards and rules very closely, being very task-oriented and having short-term relationships.Persons from low-context cultures value directness, facts and logic, and decisions are not based upon intuition, but facts. Communicators are expected to be efficient, forthright, and succinct in telling the action that is anticipated. To be totally clear and unequivocal, people from low-context cultures endeavor to utilize exact, specific words and expect them to be taken literally. Unambiguous, open contracts conclude negotiations. This is particularly dissimilar from speakers in high-context cultures who rely less on legal documents and language precision. High-context business persons might even mistrust contracts and be affronted by the lack of trust which they suggest. High context essentially means that considerable amount of unspoken information is indirectly, obliquely transferred in the course of communication. Persons in high context cultures such as South America, Asia, Middle East and Africa have the tendency of placing greater importance on loyalty as well as long-term relationships, and they have less rules and structure implemented (LeBaron, 2013). In essence, high-context cultures are contemplative, relational, intuitive and collectivist meaning that these cultures highlight interpersonal relationships. A vital initial step to any business transaction is to develop trust.

Responding well to dissimilar cultures when preparing for business communication is an integral strategy for business survival in the current global economy, and it pervades virtually every facet of business after that. Culture affects every area of business communication, which include product sourcing, human resources decisions, contract negotiations, marketing campaigns as well as production operations (Rush, 2011).

It is recommended that:

  • When dealing with business with persons from different cultures, one should consider overcoming language barriers and understanding cultural dissimilarities.
  • Each party in a business deal should take time to learn about the cultures of each other before interacting to reduce the chances of business deals being lost.
  • Business persons should have an awareness of cultural attitudes towards business since this would help the business person in communicating effectively when he/she works with persons from different cultures.

Conclusion

In conclusion, understanding the challenges as well as opportunities of intercultural communication helps one to develop effective intercultural communication which will allow him/her to foster more respect and acceptance, dismiss myths and develop more cooperative relationships with others people.Responding properly to dissimilar cultures when preparing for business communication is vital for business survival in today’s global economy. For any questions regarding the content of this memo, you may contact Joy Adamson on 442-85300-712.

References

LeBaron, M. (2013).Communication Tools for Understanding Cultural Differences. Boston, MA: CRC Press.

Rush, M. (2011). Culture in Business Communication. Columbus, OH: Penguin Publishers.

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Cross cultural communications Essay Paper

Cross cultural communications
Cross cultural communications

Cross cultural communications

Cross cultural communication, according to Clarke et al. (2001), implies the interaction between people of varied ethnic, cultural, gender, racial, religious and sexual orientation, age, and backgrounds of class. This communication entails a process of negotiating, mediating and exchanging the varied cultural differences between the persons involved through space relationships, verbal and non-verbal cues and language in general. The prerequisite to its success relies on the readiness and willingness of the people to stay open to an experience involving various cultures.

Before getting to really understand the essence of this theme, there is need to get a clear understanding of the two terms: culture and communication. Culture may be defined as the shared behaviours, values, attitudes and communication techniques that are passed within a community from one generation to the next (Thompson, 2011). It is a very complicated subject that encompasses a several aspects of day to day life from music, philosophy, art, customs amongst others. Communication, on the other hand implies a context-bound and goal-directed the exchange of ideas or meaning amongst a group or just two people: it occurs for a specified reason between people, in a certain environment and by a specified medium (Sandberg, 2005).

The context in which the communication between people takes place may imply the same culture or different cultures. In a work context, the talk on cross-culture usually involves cultural discussions with regards to such issues as the belief systems of a group, their values and day to day behaviour (Weber et al., 2011). For instance, in a case whereby a Japanese and an American are negotiating a business deal, it is very obvious that the negotiation is across different cultures, and as such, the communication is culture-bound. In communication, there is the expression of the uniqueness of the cultural heritage of a person: it not only includes non-verbal and verbal peculiarities, but also the context and medium of communication.

Such a communication is usually very challenging as one’s cultures provides one with varied ways of hearing, interpreting, thinking and seeing the world, and as such, the same word would inevitably imply very different meanings to people from varied cultures, even in a case where the language is the same. The problem even worsens where there is the use of different languages as translation is needed, whish, more often than not, leads to a very tremendous misinterpretation, thus, misunderstanding.

As outlined by Stella Ting-Toomey, there are three main ways by which culture gets to interfere with the effective understanding in a cross-cultural context. She calls the very first one ‘cognitive constraints’, which are the settings for references or perceptions which provide a backdrop upon which all the new information is inserted or compared to. The second are the ‘behaviour constraints’, which she argues that is very distinct upon cultures as each has a set of rules governing a proper behaviour that impact both the verbal and non-verbal communication (Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication). Whether a person looks at the other right in the eye, hits the nail on the head or beats about the bush, hoe close people stand when conversing, the facial expressions, as well as the gestures-all are rules governing politeness, and are very varied across cultures. The third and the last of Toomey’s factor is the ‘emotional constraints’, whereby she asserts that the emotional display is very varied across cultures. In some cultures, in the discussion of an issue, there is usually too much emotions involved and people yell, cry, exhibit anger, frustration and fears openly, whereas the other tend to keep emotions hidden and only sharing the factual or rational aspect of the involved situation. All the factors tend to bring about communication problems, and in case the involved people are not really aware of the problems potentials, there is more likeliness of them falling victim to them (Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication).

With regards to this, let us view the following two scenarios to assist in the complete discerning of the cross-cultural communication and the possible remedies in curbing or complete avoidance of the problems.

Scene 1. A manager on assignment in Japan

Firstly, this case involved a culture-bound communication as the manager is not of Japan origin, and between people of different hierarchical levels, since the manager is on a higher rank than the team members. The problem that arises may be described by a number of models which have been put forward to the difference in the value systems in countries. There are five key dimensions that explains the national culture (De Mooij & Hostede, 2010).

Hierarchy

According to Hofstede, this is the ‘power distance’, which explains the extent of acceptance of unequal power distribution by people within a given culture. On one side of the continuum are the cultures that have value for hierarchy, while at the other end are those that do not give too much attention to authority and can easily question it. The case above displays a culture that values hierarchy (Hofstede, 1996). Due to this, the team members are so glued to culture that they feel a very open brainstorming session like the case is not acceptable. The team members therefore feel it unethical to openly talk to a person in authority. Instead, they feel that the manager should just pass the laws, which they then follow.

Individualism

This dimension describes the degree to which people value self-determination. In a culture characterized by individualism, a lot of value is placed in personal success and the need to only look after personal self (Sandberg, 2005). The other case is collectivism, whereby people tend to place group loyalty at the forefront as well as serving the group interest. This case is of individualistic society, whereby the team members believe in keeping to themselves and not exchanging ideas.

The use of language

This encompasses the use of vocabulary that at some point may lead to too much confusion. This comes in the form of pronunciation, use of idioms and slang (DuPraw & Axner, 2007). There is the possibility that the manager may have used some slang, which to the team members, according to their culture, was not acceptable. The choice of words may also be very critical in the language. In the case above, the manager may have started off in a very hit on the head approach, whereby he pinpointed out directly the mistakes and the weaknesses of the team members. This may have turned off the team members as they may have recognized this as being too rude.

Scene 2. The banning of the U.S. TV airing in China

Firstly, this case uses two dragons and a Fung Fu master as being annihilated, which is very ironical as they stand out as very significant figures in China. Obviously, the citizens of China were bound to perceive this as a mockery of their culture, which would eventuate animosity and hatred towards the programme.

Possible remedies in the two cases

The following key principles may be used in curbing the problems that arise in the two cases.

Avoid making assumptions

It is very important that assumptions are not made about an individual in terms of their values and beliefs, and instead, there is the need to get to know a people very well in case you are to deal with them (Swann et al, 2009). This involves finding the precise information. Stereotypes influence our behaviours, however, we should never let them do it to an extent of tampering our habits. In the first case, the manager may have assumed the team members as collectivists. At the same time, the team members may themselves have had opinion of the manager, no wander the non-cooperativeness.

Check out if unsure

The manager may have been not very aware of the customs in the firm. In this case, there was the need for him to check out (DuPraw & Axner, 2007).  At the same time, the U.S. TV should have checked out properly to understand the values that are placed on the Kung Fu master and the dragons in the customs of China.

Share information

This principle is very vital for an effective cross-cultural communication as it gets people involved very aware of the other’s culture and values. In a system, there is the need to be willing to openly share information about your culture in order to avoid any future misunderstanding (Swann et al, 2009). In the case of the manager, there was the need for him to provide a session for sharing on the team members’ cultures before settling down in the brainstorming. The second scenario also require the same as this could have avoided the clash that occurred which led to the ban.

References

Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication (2014). Retrieved from: http://www.colorado.edu. [Accessed on 5th May, 2014]

De Mooij M, Hostede G (2010). The Hofstede Model – Applications to Global Branding and Advertising Strategy and Research. Int. J. Advert., 29(1): 85-110.)

G.RG. Clarke, R. Cull, M.S.M. Peria, S.M. Sanchez. Foreign Bank Entry: Experience, Implications for Developing Countries, and Agenda for Further Research. – Washington, 2003.

Hofstede G (1996).  Cultures and organizations; software of the mind.  Intercultural co-operation and its importance for survival.  McGraw-Hill (Revised edition).

M.E. DuPraw & M. Axner. (2007). Working on Common Cross-cultural Communication Challenges, 2007.

Sandberg, J. (2005). Monitoring of Workers Is Boss’s Right but Why Not Include Top Brass? The Wall Street Journal, p. 1.

Swann, William B., Jr., Ángel Gómez, D. Conor Seyle, J. Francisco Morales, and Carmen Huici, (2009). “Identity Fusion: The Interplay of Personal and Social Identities in Extreme Group Behavior,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 96, No. 5, 2009, pp. 995–1011.

Thompson LL (2011). The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator (5th Ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Weber Y, Belkin T, Tarba SY (2011). Negotiation, Cultural Differences, and Planning in Mergers and Acquisitions. J. Transnatl. Manag., 16(2): 107-115.

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Cross Cultural Communication Essay Paper

Cross Cultural Communication
Cross Cultural Communication

 Cross Cultural Communication Essay

SAMPLE ANSWER

Cross Cultural Communication

Cross cultural communication, according to Clarke et al. (2001), implies the interaction between people of varied ethnic, cultural, gender, racial, religious and sexual orientation, age, and backgrounds of class. This communication entails a process of negotiating, mediating and exchanging the varied cultural differences between the persons involved through space relationships, verbal and non-verbal cues and language in general. The prerequisite to its success relies on the readiness and willingness of the people to stay open to an experience involving various cultures.

Before getting to really understand the essence of this theme, there is need to get a clear understanding of the two terms: culture and communication. Culture may be defined as the shared behaviours, values, attitudes and communication techniques that are passed within a community from one generation to the next (Thompson, 2011). It is a very complicated subject that encompasses a several aspects of day to day life from music, philosophy, art, customs amongst others. Communication, on the other hand implies a context-bound and goal-directed the exchange of ideas or meaning amongst a group or just two people: it occurs for a specified reason between people, in a certain environment and by a specified medium (Sandberg, 2005).

The context in which the communication between people takes place may imply the same culture or different cultures. In a work context, the talk on cross-culture usually involves cultural discussions with regards to such issues as the belief systems of a group, their values and day to day behaviour (Weber et al., 2011). For instance, in a case whereby a Japanese and an American are negotiating a business deal, it is very obvious that the negotiation is across different cultures, and as such, the communication is culture-bound. In communication, there is the expression of the uniqueness of the cultural heritage of a person: it not only includes non-verbal and verbal peculiarities, but also the context and medium of communication.

Such a communication is usually very challenging as one’s cultures provides one with varied ways of hearing, interpreting, thinking and seeing the world, and as such, the same word would inevitably imply very different meanings to people from varied cultures, even in a case where the language is the same. The problem even worsens where there is the use of different languages as translation is needed, which, more often than not, leads to a very tremendous misinterpretation, thus, misunderstanding.

As outlined by Stella Ting-Toomey, there are three main ways by which culture gets to interfere with the effective understanding in a cross-cultural context. She calls the very first one ‘cognitive constraints’, which are the settings for references or perceptions which provide a backdrop upon which all the new information is inserted or compared to. The second are the ‘behaviour constraints’, which she argues that is very distinct upon cultures as each has a set of rules governing a proper behaviour that impact both the verbal and non-verbal communication (Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication). Whether a person looks at the other right in the eye, hits the nail on the head or beats about the bush, hoe close people stand when conversing, the facial expressions, as well as the gestures-all are rules governing politeness, and are very varied across cultures. The third and the last of Toomey’s factor is the ‘emotional constraints’, whereby she asserts that the emotional display is very varied across cultures. In some cultures, in the discussion of an issue, there is usually too much emotions involved and people yell, cry, exhibit anger, frustration and fears openly, whereas the other tend to keep emotions hidden and only sharing the factual or rational aspect of the involved situation. All the factors tend to bring about communication problems, and in case the involved people are not really aware of the problems potentials, there is more likeliness of them falling victim to them (Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication).

With regards to this, let us view the following two scenarios to assist in the complete discerning of the cross-cultural communication and the possible remedies in curbing or complete avoidance of the problems.

Scene 1. A manager on assignment in Japan

Firstly, this case involved a culture-bound communication as the manager is not of Japan origin, and between people of different hierarchical levels, since the manager is on a higher rank than the team members. The problem that arises may be described by a number of models which have been put forward to the difference in the value systems in countries. There are five key dimensions that explains the national culture (De Mooij & Hostede, 2010).

Hierarchy

According to Hofstede, this is the ‘power distance’, which explains the extent of acceptance of unequal power distribution by people within a given culture. On one side of the continuum are the cultures that have value for hierarchy, while at the other end are those that do not give too much attention to authority and can easily question it. The case above displays a culture that values hierarchy (Hofstede, 1996). Due to this, the team members are so glued to culture that they feel a very open brainstorming session like the case is not acceptable. The team members therefore feel it unethical to openly talk to a person in authority. Instead, they feel that the manager should just pass the laws, which they then follow.

Individualism

This dimension describes the degree to which people value self-determination. In a culture characterized by individualism, a lot of value is placed in personal success and the need to only look after personal self (Sandberg, 2005). The other case is collectivism, whereby people tend to place group loyalty at the forefront as well as serving the group interest. This case is of individualistic society, whereby the team members believe in keeping to themselves and not exchanging ideas.

The use of language

This encompasses the use of vocabulary that at some point may lead to too much confusion. This comes in the form of pronunciation, use of idioms and slang (DuPraw & Axner, 2007). There is the possibility that the manager may have used some slang, which to the team members, according to their culture, was not acceptable. The choice of words may also be very critical in the language. In the case above, the manager may have started off in a very hit on the head approach, whereby he pinpointed out directly the mistakes and the weaknesses of the team members. This may have turned off the team members as they may have recognized this as being too rude.

Scene 2. The banning of the U.S. TV airing in China

Firstly, this case uses two dragons and a Fung Fu master as being annihilated, which is very ironical as they stand out as very significant figures in China. Obviously, the citizens of China were bound to perceive this as a mockery of their culture, which would eventuate animosity and hatred towards the programme.

Possible remedies in the two cases

The following key principles may be used in curbing the problems that arise in the two cases.

Avoid making assumptions

It is very important that assumptions are not made about an individual in terms of their values and beliefs, and instead, there is the need to get to know a people very well in case you are to deal with them (Swann et al, 2009). This involves finding the precise information. Stereotypes influence our behaviours, however, we should never let them do it to an extent of tampering our habits. In the first case, the manager may have assumed the team members as collectivists. At the same time, the team members may themselves have had opinion of the manager, no wander the non-cooperativeness.

Check out if unsure

The manager may have been not very aware of the customs in the firm. In this case, there was the need for him to check out (DuPraw & Axner, 2007).  At the same time, the U.S. TV should have checked out properly to understand the values that are placed on the Kung Fu master and the dragons in the customs of China.

Share information

This principle is very vital for an effective cross-cultural communication as it gets people involved very aware of the other’s culture and values. In a system, there is the need to be willing to openly share information about your culture in order to avoid any future misunderstanding (Swann et al, 2009). In the case of the manager, there was the need for him to provide a session for sharing on the team members’ cultures before settling down in the brainstorming. The second scenario also require the same as this could have avoided the clash that occurred which led to the ban.

References

Cultural Barriers to Effective Communication (2014). Retrieved from: http://www.colorado.edu. [Accessed on 5th May, 2014]

De Mooij M, Hostede G (2010). The Hofstede Model – Applications to Global Branding and Advertising Strategy and Research. Int. J. Advert., 29(1): 85-110.)

G.RG. Clarke, R. Cull, M.S.M. Peria, S.M. Sanchez. Foreign Bank Entry: Experience, Implications for Developing Countries, and Agenda for Further Research. – Washington, 2003.

Hofstede G (1996).  Cultures and organizations; software of the mind.  Intercultural co-operation and its importance for survival.  McGraw-Hill (Revised edition).

M.E. DuPraw & M. Axner. (2007). Working on Common Cross-cultural Communication Challenges, 2007.

Sandberg, J. (2005). Monitoring of Workers Is Boss’s Right but Why Not Include Top Brass? The Wall Street Journal, p. 1.

Swann, William B., Jr., Ángel Gómez, D. Conor Seyle, J. Francisco Morales, and Carmen Huici, (2009). “Identity Fusion: The Interplay of Personal and Social Identities in Extreme Group Behavior,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 96, No. 5, 2009, pp. 995–1011.

Thompson LL (2011). The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator (5th Ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Weber Y, Belkin T, Tarba SY (2011). Negotiation, Cultural Differences, and Planning in Mergers and Acquisitions. J. Transnatl. Manag., 16(2): 107-115.

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Conversational Style Essay Paper Assignment

Conversational Style
Conversational Style

Conversational Style Essay

Write a supported argument after reading the chapter which I send to you. Evaluating each article from this chapter. The overall point of your essay is to
decide, of the concepts you explored, if the writer is correct in her assessment and how people truly communicate and the issues they come across during that communication.

In your essay, you need to explore 4 Tannen’s concepts in detail (I already chose and send the picture to you). Concepts are generally marked as italicized subheadings within chapters.

You have a lot of information that you may include in your discussion of each concept, including Tannen’s definition of the concept, Tannen’s dialogue
example,a personal example of your own. Overall however, your discussion of each concept should yield for the reader a clear understanding about how you feel about the validity of each of Tannen’s concepts you investigate. Your own example will either echo Tannen’s views, or refute them. It is okay to agree with some of the concepts you explore and not others– your thesis will then just state the difference.

Essay Specific:
* Have an introduction and an argumentative thesis that reveals whether you agree with Tannen’s proposed concepts or not.
* Include detailed observations or examples that either agree or refute with Tannen.
* A conclusion

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Report on a Healthcare Practitioner Communication

Report on a Healthcare Practitioner Communication
Report on a Healthcare Practitioner Communication

Practitioner report: For this assignment, you are required to write a 4-page report on a healthcare practitioner communication experiences, interpersonal communication strategies, and the communication demands related to his or her occupation. Be sure to follow the mandatory format for submitted work listed below.

To prepare for this interview, you are required to prepare an interview preparation report that includes: the name of your selected health care provider, contact information of your selected health care provider (phone number, e-mail, location of work), the date, time, and location you are meeting at, and your list of at least 15 questions. (my selected health care provider is Erica Olsen RN, BSN
Contact information cell is 435-705- 0730, IHC River Road, ICU due to conflicting schedules the interview was conducted over the phone, text messages and
email.)

The practitioner report should be formatted as follows (please label each section):
1. Section one: briefly describe the health care practitioner’s occupation, major day-to-day activities, and self-identified major communication challenges (for example, what does you see as the most significant communication challenges associated with your occupation?). You must also include his/her contact information here including phone and e-mail (please note, if I am unable to verify your selected practitioner’s credentials via the contact information you provide, you will fail this assignment). This section should be no more than two paragraphs in length.

2. Section two: this is the largest section of the paper and contains the ‘meat’ of this assignment. Select and define four key terms, concepts, and/or
theories we’ve covered in our course material and then explain how they relate to your selected health care practitioner’s communication interactions. Please underline each term the first time you use and define it. This section should be approximately 2 pages in length.

3. Section three: wrap-up your paper by identifying specifically key communication behaviors you’d like to employ in your own interpersonal health
communication interactions (either as a patient, caregiver, or both) and why they are important. This section should be one page.

1 Question: Do you find the language diversity to be a problem for communication in this area?
Answer: I don’t think the language diversity is a problem here because of where we live. We live in an area where 99.9% of the patient population speaks
English. When we do run into a patient who doesn’t speak English, we have a variety of translators to use.

2 Question: What trading have you had in communications?
Answer: I have taken a general communications course through college as well as several Communication courses in Nursing School which specifically outline diversity. The hospital also provides ongoing required education practices.

3 Question: do you think that students should have more training in communication and if so what would you suggest for students to take?
Answer: I think students should learn to listen more, and pick up on communication ques. There is generally a way to speak to patients and how not to speak to patients. A lot of students come through and are great and down to earth and really engage the patients and some come through and are completely awkward and it makes things uncomfortable for the patient.

4 Question: What if any experiences have you had dealing with terminal patient’s families and how does that vary from other patients?
Answer: Since being in ICU I deal with terminal patients and their families quite often. This requires more patience, more listening, and a great deal of
empathy. Yes all patients require these things, but it is much more demanding and time consuming when someone is terminal.

5 Question: Do you find it easier to communicate with children, adults, or the elderly?
Answer: I think that it just depends on the person I encounter. I have taken care of children who act more mature and reasonable than grown adults. Although
I do love to take care of the VERY elderly as they tend to be to the point, know what they want and need, are appreciative and thankful, and usually have
tons of wisdom to share.

6 Question: What or how does communication vary between the elderly versus children?
Answer: We don’t take of anyone younger than 18 in the hospital usually so I don’t have experience with children.

7 : Does a patient’s ethnicity change the way you communicate if so why and how does it change?
Answer: Yes, I think a patient’s ethnicity changes the way I communicate with them. You get to know which culture’s finds something disrespectful or
inappropriate and you have to make adjustments based on that. You also have to let patients and families interact and visit the way they deem appropriate.

8 Question: What are some strategies you have developed to communicate with patients in the ICU?
Answer: Since working in ICU, I have become very good at charades. Many/Most of my patients are intubated and cannot talk, but that usually does not stop them from trying. I have to be good at reading lips, pointing, gestures, grunts, etc. or they become very frustrated with a lack of communication with
others.

9 Question: Is there a different communication style in the ICU vs other department’s?
Answer: I think the only difference I have noticed is that the nurses in ICU seem to be a little hardened by the severity of what they have seen. They might
seem jaded by the frequency of death, illness, and traumas that they witness.

10 Question: What is the protocol for communication in the ICU do only certain people speak?
Answer: Everybody speaks in ICU!! Too much!

11 Question: How does communication vary from doctor to doctor nurse to nurse and Doctor to nurse and nurse to Doctor?
Answer: ICU is a very tight knit unit and everybody works extremely close for the entire shift. There really is no difference in how anyone talks to anyone
else. Other floors seemed to be different as some of the doctors were arrogant and didn’t like to talk to nurses, but in ICU it is much different.

12 Question: What if any communication problems have you encountered, were you able to solve them and how?
Answer: I have really never had any communication problems with anybody, but if I did I would directly confront that person and be open, honest, and
respectful.

13 Question: Has your communication style changed since you have switched depts.? If so how?
Answer: I don’t think my communication style has changed at all. I have always been open, easy to talk to, and direct.

14 Question: How, if at all do you think working as a medical professional has changed the way you communicate with people in your everyday life?
Answer:?I tend to be more open and positive I think. I talk to people ALL day so I think that I have taken down any barriers I had in the past with being
shy, quiet, or self-confident.

15 Question: do communication style vary from dept. to dept., if so how and what do you think could be done to improve communication?
Answer: I think they are about the same. Everyone has their loyalties though to their own floor, so we can become very critical of others. I think we all
just need to remember that we are there for one reason. A paycheck. Just kidding. The Patient!

16 Question: Has your communication style changed since you have switched depts.? If so how?
Answer: I don’t think my communication style has changed at all. I have always been open, easy to talk to, and direct.

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